News

Welcome to our New Graduates

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We’re delighted to welcome two new faces to the Madsen Giering Team!

Joining us as Graduate Engineers are Amit Shrees and Jimmy Chan.

“We’re delighted to welcome Amit and Jimmy to the Madsen Giersing team and are thrilled that they have chosen Madsen Giersing as the best place to start their careers and further develop their skills,” said Madsen Giersing’s Lasse Madsen.

“Our graduates have the opportunity to immerse themselves in every aspect of our business and work on some amazing projects as they go through a program designed to be the foundation for their future engineering careers. We are excited to see the contribution they both make to our organisation and the success of our clients’ projects.

Having completed a Bachelor of Civil Engineering at QUT, Amit has established his career as a highly regarded young engineer and is looking forward to the opportunity to bring his structural engineering knowledge to our projects. “I can’t wait to bring my technical skills and experiences to Madsen Giersing. The opportunity the graduate program offers to develop my skills further while making a positive contribution to the future of Madsen Giersing is very exciting and I’m delighted to join the team.”

Jimmy joins us after completing a Bachelor of Civil Engineering at QUT and a Master of Civil Engineering at the University of Queensland.  “Madsen Giersing has a reputation for delivering technically excellent and innovative projects to overcome complex engineering challenges,” said Jimmy. “I’m confident that my background, education and aspirations will align with the values of the team, and I cannot wait to get started and make a contribution to our future success.”

Madsen Giersing Secures Multiple New Projects

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It has been a busy couple of months at Madsen Giersing as our team builds on our portfolio of marine infrastructure projects securing work to support the development of infrastructure in Australia and Papua New Guinea.

Key wins include:

  • The design of a temporary crane platform for Brady Marine and Civil to support the development of Ampol’s product wharf in Brisbane.
  • Providing expert advice to John Holland on flood loading for the new structures set to transform Brisbane’s Waterfront Place and Eagle Street Pier as part of a once in a generation project which will create a stunning business and tourist destination in the heart of the city.
  • Undertaking a structural review for AIE of a temporary jetty at Port Hedland for their client BHP.
  • Performing an assessment of bridge structures for Exxon Mobil Papua New Guinea to ensure their current and long-term health and performance.

CEO Lasse Madsen, “We are delighted to have partnered with organisations across Australia and Papua New Guinea to support their major engineering works. The projects we have secured highlight the depth of talent and industry expertise that we have at our disposal and our team is excited to bring their skills to enhance the design capability of each lead contractor and client. As the projects come to life, we are looking forward to seeing their progress from design through to construction,” said Lasse.

Meet The Team – Lasse Madsen

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CEO of Madsen Giersing, Lasse Madsen, celebrated 19 years with the organisation recently, so we caught up with Lasse to learn more about his career to date, favourite projects and the inspirations behind his career in engineering.

Peter and Lasse at the start of Lasse’s career at Madsen Giersing.

Why did you become an engineer?

Like many engineers, I have been inspired by structures, bridges, buildings, and anything I saw growing up or travelling. I always enjoyed building, creating and designing my own feats of engineering with Lego, so when added to my family history of engineering, there was only ever going to be one way my career went.

What do you love about engineering?

I enjoy solving a difficult problem and working to find a solution. There is something satisfying about taking the time to get under the skin of a problem, take the challenge on and work out an efficient and safe design to create a solution.

What are you working on at the moment?

To support the expansion of IOR Petroleum’s Lytton Terminal to a multiple bulk fuel import, storage, and distribution terminal, I am designing a temporary crane support platform for 500T crawler crane.

I am also involved in the design of the temporary works to support the transformation of Sydney Fishmarket, a major redevelopment that will see a waterfront promenade, a ferry wharf and more than 6,000 square metres of new public open space created to support the iconic tourist attraction’s growth and future.

What has been your greatest professional achievement to date?

It has to be having the opportunity to work with my father, Peter, for the past 19 years. It has been fantastic to work with him, to learn from his experience and to be entrusted to take Madsen Giersing into the future as CEO and build on his legacy of three decades of achievement.

What’s the best project you have worked on?

Motukea Cargo Wharf for Curtain Brothers in Papua New Guinea. It is one of those complex projects that engineers love, with a number of challenges to overcome and some interesting design features.  The berth is 210m long and accommodates vessels up to 60,000 DWT.

The top of the berth is at RL 4.5m and comprises a 1.6m wide concrete capping beam, and the berth pocket is at RL -13m. The berth is a gravity-type structure comprising cellular cofferdams, each with a diameter of 20m and constructed from flat sheet piles.

What would your last meal be?

Simplicity is the key for me, so I’d have to go with steak, chips and a salad.

What is the last movie you watched or series you binged?

Top Gun Maverick. Who doesn’t love a bit of high-octane nostalgia?

Who’s the greatest engineer of all time and why?

There are so many engineers to choose from that it’s hard to pick one. But structure I have always admired the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. Designed by John A Roebling, it is the perfect combination of function and form for me, as it combines some great engineering, looks spectacular and provided a vital connection between Brooklyn and Manhattan that shaped the future of New York.

What would be your dream project to work on from history?

Without a doubt, the Brooklyn Bridge. For the reasons above, but also because, at the time, it was a technological marvel with John A Roebling designing a machine that twisted steel wire into cable, making construction possible.

What piece of advice would you give to an aspiring engineer?

If you are not passionate and don’t like problem-solving, engineering is probably not for you!

What has been the biggest change in your 19 years at Madsen Giersing?

There have been several changes, but the standouts for me are how the industry is changing with technology and an industry-wide focus on health and safety, the environment and sustainability.

What is your favourite project across the 19 years, and why?

Our work with Curtain Brothers on their Motukea facility in Papua New Guinea. We have supported numerous aspects of the project in our long-term partnership and have delivered exceptional results. From a slipway designed to accept ships up to 10,000 DWT with a length of 110m and a maximum lightweight of 5,300t to a 210m export wharf which accommodates vessels up to 60,000 DWT, each stage of the facility’s development has been the perfect example of collaboration between client and consultant to design marine infrastructure to support a client’s need.

What has been the most challenging project you have supported, and why?

Hegigio Gorge Pipe Bridge. It was a technically challenging project in very tough geographical conditions and a remote location.

The bridge comprises three catenary cables, two horizontal and one vertical, joined together by a series of wire stays and cross beams. Two parallel runway beams connect the series of cross beams, allowing access along the bridge via a trolley. The main cable is connected to a 33m high A-frame tower at the southern abutment and a 4m high tower at the northern abutment.

Madsen Giersing designed various structures to provide access during construction, including two temporary platforms bolted to the top of the south tower and two 12-storey 9m x 3m access towers. The access towers were also designed to allow the south tower A-frame to be raised using a reeved system specifically designed for this purpose.

To launch the bridge, horizontal cables, cross and runway beams, and a restraint system was developed to allow the bridge to be launched in a safe and controlled manner. Several structures were designed to assist in forming, positioning and launching the horizontal cables, each comprised of 70 strands. These structures included a guide tower, cable reel and deflector towers.

Madsen Giersing designed two trolleys to install the oil pipelines; one to pull the pipelines across the bridge and the other to allow personnel access along the bridge to install pipe clamps at the cross beams.

As a project, it showcases everything we do well at Madsen Giersing.

What do you think will be the biggest change in engineering in the next 19 years?

It will be the continued roll-out and technology. From digital twins of structures to Artificial Intelligence testing concrete or steel health, technology will continue to play a greater role in engineering.

Meet The Team – Sam Madsen

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Madsen Giersing’s Sam Madsen is the driving force behind the scenes of everything that happens within our organisation. From managing systems, quality and human resources to marketing support, Sam’s involvement is central to everything that we do. As a non-engineering professional, we caught up with Sam to learn a little more about her career, her love of engineering and how non-engineers can be valuable members of our industry.

How did you become part of the engineering and infrastructure industry?

Through my husband Lasse, CEO of Madsen Giersing and his wonderful parents. The opportunity unexpectantly arose for me to become part of the company. I am so grateful and enjoy so much working with the three of them. They are incredible people.

What do you love about working in engineering?

The way engineers’ and drafters’ brains work. It amazes me to watch Lasse’s brain work, from concept to design and then see the drafting team draft it up to turn it into a design ready for construction. It’s not something I can do; my brain doesn’t think that way! To be honest, I can’t even put an archive box together, so I really appreciate the way that engineers can take a problem, create a solution and then turn that solution into something that solves the problem

What are you working on at the moment?

I’m working on our new graduate program for engineers and draftspersons, and the fun stuff like arranging our end-of-year party and the Christmas hampers for our team and clients.

What has been your greatest professional achievement to date?

My Bachelor of Behavioural Science. School was not my bag; I was probably unlucky that many of the subjects the current generation gets to study were not available, so to go on and achieve a bachelor’s in a field I love and am passionate about was a real achievement.

What’s the best project you have worked on?

Not so much specific projects, but I look back on the work I have done that has enabled me to apply what I have learned and help a business to transform. For example, I coordinated programs and organisational psychology services and implemented systems and processes for a private sector clinical and organisational psychological firm and managed the banking finances and legal team for a recruitment firm. In both roles, I could positively apply my degree and support the organisation and people to adopt, embed and take to business-as-usual new systems and processes.

Now I get to do this for MG and work with my husband daily, which I am so grateful for.

What’s the most useful thing you’ve learned throughout your career? 

Behind everyone’s title and desk is a human, just like you and I, who has struggles, dreams, strengths and vulnerabilities. And as such, I always approach everyone and every situation with loving kindness and, where appropriate, a sense of humour.

What would your last meal be?

Pink French champagne, my dad’s beef stroganoff with fresh green beans, and a ridiculous portion of chocolate brownie with vanilla ice cream, followed by a block of Whittakers Hokey Pokey Chocolate and a glass of Tassie Pinot. If I have to go, I’m going out in style and with a massively unhealthy dose of calories, sugar and fizzy goodness!

What is the last movie you watched or series you binged?

Ticket to Paradise with Julia Roberts and George Clooney ticked all the boxes of what the world needs right now, love, laughter, and a happy ending. I am also enjoying My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman and just finished A Million Little Things and Bali 2002 on Stan.

Who do you admire in business?

It is such a cliché but Richard Branson. One of my sons has several learning challenges, and I see his struggles daily. But we are fortunate to live in a time where these are celebrated and accepted, and there is a lot of technologist assistance, help available and awareness. For Richard Branson to achieve what he has with dyslexia during a time when understanding and targeted education would not have been available is incredible and inspiring.

What excites you about the future of our industry?

I don’t know! Automation actually scares me a little. At the back of our minds, we always worry about the work we do being replaced by a machine. But then there are jobs that do not even exist yet that my sons will likely be involved in and new opportunities for reduced work, flexible work, safer work and for some, less mind-numbing or dangerous work that the machines are welcome to. What I am finding exciting about our industry is the move to the mindset of sustainability, upcycling, recycling and the environment being at the forefront of engineering now more so than ever. It is very exciting to see how we can use our collective knowledge to learn from past mistakes and build a bright future.

What would be your dream project to work on from history?
The Hoover Dam, Panama Canal, Millau Viaduct in France, and The Palm Island in Dubai. All of these feats of engineering amaze me. Their scale is incredible, and they should be applauded as monuments to our ability to think, problem-solve and engineer amazing structures to support people, create opportunities and enhance our lives.

What piece of advice would you give to a non-engineer looking to build a career in engineering?

Go for it! Supporting roles like mine and administration roles, help make up the whole team and work well. And engineers and drafters are some of the loveliest people I have ever met, it makes for a really lovely work environment.

Madsen Giersing Supporting Transformation of Fuel Import Terminal

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As part of the transformation of IOR Petroleum’s Lytton Terminal to a multiple bulk fuel import, storage, and distribution terminal, Madsen Giersing has been engaged to bring our design, consulting and construction experience to the project. Located at the Fisherman Islands Tanker Terminal at the Port of Brisbane, the project will see fuel imported via two new marine loading arms and a new pipeline running from the tanker terminal to IOR’s terminal. Constructed on a new platform located immediately downstream of the existing lading platform and the first downstream dolphin, our team will:

  • Undertake the detailed design of the new loading marine loading arm platform and in river and on land pipe supports within the tanker terminal boundary for the new pipeline.
  • Provide engineering advice, including berthing and mooring analyses for the vessels delivering the bulk fuel for IOR to the existing terminal; and,
  • Provide technical support during construction, including undertaking site inspections.

Madsen Giersing’s Jay McIntyre outlined the team’s approach, “The tanker terminal will remain operational during the site works, with a critical design requirement being to not interfere with the existing terminal operations. We are well versed in undertaking critical works in live operational environments so we have been able to take an approach that utilises our experience and commitment to innovation that will see the design use fewer large vertical-driven tubular steel piles for the new MLA platform and in river pipe support structures. In addition, precast concrete shells, tied together with an in-situ concrete infill to form the deck of the new platform. This eliminates the need for temporary falsework, which would have been required for an in-situ concrete deck.”

“As can be seen from the site photos, the construction of the precast units for the new platform deck is well underway, and we look forward to seeing the project progress through construction.”

Madsen Giersing Appointed to Engineering Panel

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Madsen Giersing is delighted to have been appointed to the Queensland Rail Contract QRP-21-42  Civil / Structural Engineering and Investigative Services Panel.

CEO, Lasse Madsen, welcomed the appointment, “We are thrilled to have been selected to become a member of a panel supporting Queensland Rail’s engineering and investigative services requirements.”

“We have enjoyed working with Queensland Rail in the past across critical projects, including groundbreaking analysis of bridge structures across QR’s bridge network in the Wide Bay region. The project saw us create an engineering solution that preserved and extended the lifespan of several century-old bridges without fundamentally changing the structure’s look.”

“In addition, through our partnership with Canstruct as the contractor, we worked with the University of Queensland using sections from decommissioned bridges to undertake a testing programme that would provide a complete structural analysis that could act as a baseline for bridges of a similar age.

“Working with UQ enabled us to utilise their facilities to undertake comprehensive testing in a controlled environment, using the latest technologies and techniques. We provided feedback on bridge performance through our testing and analysis, assisting a major asset owner in keeping vital transport connections operational.”

“As panellists, we look forward to supporting Queensland Rail as they manage, grow and deliver assets vital to the movement of people and goods in Queensland,” said Lasse.

Learn more about our prior work with Queensland Rail here: https://madsengiersing.com.au/giving-pioneering-engineering-a-new-lease-of-life/

Granite Island Causeway benefits from Madsen Giersing expertise

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In 2021, Madsen Giersing were engaged by McConnell Dowell to undertake marine works to support the Department for Infrastructure and Transport’s development of the new Granite Island Causeway that connects the island with Victor Harbor located in South Australia.

The Granite Island Causeway is the only link between Granite Island and the Mainland. The original structure was first constructed in 1864 as Victoria Pier, before being extended to connect to Granite Island in 1875. It has become one of the region’s most iconic and popular tourist attractions. Refurbished in the late 1950s, the Causeway has stood up to the rigours of nature, but time has taken its toll. A condition assessment identified that the original Causeway was approaching the end of its useful life and a feasibility study into the potential upgrade options determined that retaining the existing structure was not viable.

The new Causeway, which opened at the end of 2021, has continued to deliver and enhance social and economic benefits to the region and provides a long-term solution that is environmentally sensitive.

The South Australian Government embarked on a project to replace the old structure. Works were undertaken between April and December 2021, with Madsen Giersing engaged to support the construction of the new Causeway.

Lasse Madsen outlined the team’s involvement, “We are delighted to have worked with the Department for Infrastructure and Transport and McConnell Dowell on what will become a new icon for the region. We were engaged to directly support the construction of the new Causeway due to our experience of temporary marine works.”

“We designed the Causeway’s temporary works, including two travelling platforms that enabled the Causeway to be progressively constructed from the Mainland side. The platforms provided support for cranes to access the work front and for materials to be simply and safely moved to where they were required as the project developed. Our approach ensured that construction was undertaken as efficiently as possible and for the new structure to be delivered to the community at the earliest opportunity.”

For more information about the project, visit:  http://www.dit.sa.gov.au/gicauseway

Senior Structural Draftsperson

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Do you have a passion for drafting, engineering and design and want to kick start your career working on exciting projects? If this sounds like you, read on!

Based in Brisbane, Madsen Giersing is the leading engineering consultancy in Structural Design Engineering specialising in marine structures, bridges, and temporary works throughout Australia, PNG, and South-East Asia, providing engineering consultancy services to both the private and public sectors.

What we offer

  • Based in Newstead, Brisbane, we are a small, tight-knit team
  • A friendly and thoughtful team
  • Modern working environment on a top floor office in Newstead with close proximity to public transport and The Gasworks and Emporium complexes with their cafes
  • End of ride facilities including bike storage and showers
  • Close-knit culture and open-door policy
  • Friday drinks
  • Team morning and afternoons teas

Key Responsibilities

  • Use CAD equipment to prepare routine layouts, detail drawings, assembly drawings, sketches and diagrams
  • Predominately Structural Steel and concrete AutoCAD drafting

Knowledge, Skills and Experience

  • Qualifications in Computer Aided Drafting (CAD)
  • 5+ years in a similar role
  • Ability to use related equipment and hardware including but not limited to CAD system, Auto Desk software, MS Excel and Word at an advanced level

How to Apply

To be considered, please apply to mgce@madsengiersing.com.au by attaching your Covering Letter, your current CV, and your Academic Transcript(s).

We are an equal opportunity employer and value diversity in our company.

Cadet Draftsperson

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Do you have a passion for drafting, engineering and design and want to kick start your career working on exciting projects? If this sounds like you, read on!

Based in Brisbane, Madsen Giersing is the leading engineering consultancy in Structural Design Engineering specialising in marine structures, bridges, and temporary works throughout Australia, PNG, and South-East Asia, providing engineering consultancy services to both private and public sector.

What we offer

Working alongside our Chief Drafter and Structural Design Team, we will support you with training in the latest computer-aided design packages and technical skills required, as well as provide genuine hands-on experience and mentoring opportunities to develop your career.

  • Based in Newstead, Brisbane, we  are a small, tight-knit team working on some of the industry’s leading projects.
  • A friendly and thoughtful team
  • Modern working environment on a top floor office in Newstead with close proximity to public transport and The Gasworks and Emporium complexes with their cafes
  • End of ride facilities including bike storage and showers
  • Close-knit culture and open-door policy
  • Friday drinks
  • Team morning teas

Sound like you?

To be considered, please apply to mgce@madsengiersing.com.au by attaching your Covering Letter, your current CV, and your Academic Transcript(s).

We are an equal opportunity employer and value diversity in our company.

Meet The Team – Burt Wilken

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Burt joined Madsen Giersing as a graduate engineer in January 2021, following the completion of his studies at the University of Queensland, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Engineering (Hons) in 2020.

Originally from South Africa, Burt migrated to Brisbane with his family when he was ten and has called the city home ever since. With a natural aptitude for maths and science, Burt is one of life’s problem-solvers, which led to his career in marine structural design with Madsen Giersing.

We caught up with Burt to find out a little bit more about him, his passion for engineering, love of potatoes and the potential for floating cities.

Why did you become an engineer?

I have always been intrigued by how the things around me work. Why do air conditioners emit hot air outside? How does concrete “dry” underwater? (Hint, it doesn’t dry). Why do traffic lights seem to change just in time (Or sometimes annoyingly not)? Being an engineer is all about understanding how the world works and how you can use it to your advantage.

What do you love about engineering?

No two days are the same; there’s always a new puzzle to solve. I enjoy being challenged, but also knowing that what I’m doing might have a lasting impact for decades to come is very rewarding.

What are you working on at the moment?

I am currently designing berthing structures for a new 60m ferry cat to be used in South Australia. It has been interesting evaluating how current infrastructure can be repurposed to make up part of the design.

What has been your greatest professional achievement to date?

Madsen Giersing has very high standards when it comes to quality of work, systems and processes and adapting to meet the high standards has been a challenge, but one that I have risen to. We are proud of the quality of work that we do, and it is great that we all work together to ensure we retain our reputation for quality.

What’s the best project you have worked on?

There are so many to choose from. One of the best things about working at Madsen Giersing is that we have a variety of projects across a number of sectors in locations across Australia and South-East Asia.

My favourite to date has been the Woodlark Island Gold Project.

In my opinion, the most fun a structural engineer can have is setting up FEA models and seeing the rainbow of colours come out at the end. A memorable project stands out, where MG was engaged as the structural design engineers for a gold export wharf. The soil conditions were extremely challenging to work with, which led to quite an impressive design solution that utilised precast concrete elements used in combination with in-situ poured concrete. The construction sequence alone took me a couple of hours to fully grasp.

Another issue was the design of an unloading roll-on roll-off-ramp, which had to be designed for extremely heavy mining equipment. The ramp had to be close to the water surface so that vehicles could drive onto it from a barge. Coming up with a design that could deal with the poor soil conditions, be as cost-effective as possible and meet the requirements of having a low approach point was truly challenging.

What’s the most useful thing you’ve learned throughout your career?

Well, my career is still in its infant stages, but I would have to say a resilient mindset is important for continued personal and professional development.

What would your last meal be?

This is a tough one, but I am a sucker for potatoes. They’re so versatile; potato chips, hot chips, roasted potato, mashed potato, baked potato, potato salad. Potatoes also seem to fill scrawny people quite well, which is a plus.

What is the last movie you watched or series you binged?

I have recently finished the third season of the Netflix original “You”. There’s something very gripping about viewing the world from a psychopath’s perspective.

Who’s the greatest engineer of all time and why?

I remember giving a speech in grade 4 about Henry Ford, who I’m sure requires no introduction. He not only designed the first automobile but implemented the assembly line technique of mass production. One of the things he said which has stuck with me is that “Any customer can have a car painted any colour that he wants, so long as it is black.” This is the type of humour I hear used around the office.

What excites you about the future of our industry?

I remember a uni professor fascinating us with stories of where countries like Singapore are heading. With an ever-growing population and very limited space, they are looking at expanding their cities onto the water. Floating cities not only sound cool but also gets the engineer in me excited for what’s to come with our changing climate.

What would be your dream project to work on from history?

The Millau Viaduct in Southern France, hands down. Not only is it the tallest bridge in the world (336.4m), but there is a certain elegance of a cable-stayed bridge that no other structure can match.

What piece of advice would you give to an aspiring engineer?

Develop a passion for learning new things. I know it sounds like a cliché, but great engineers never stop adapting, learning, and refining their technical ability. A career in engineering is a career spent constantly learning new things.

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